Author Archives: GeorgeKing

COVID and Coagulation

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The onset of COVID-19 presents many challenges to the medical community. Coagulation entered the fray with the discovery of abnormal clotting in patients with severe COVID-19. Doctors originally thought COVID-19 was a respiratory virus, “albeit a contagious and lethal one with no vaccine or treatment.” However, cases that did not fit the pattern of a respiratory virus   …Continue Reading


Q&A with Chris Bombardier

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Q: Our audience is primarily Laboratory Professionals, what message you would have for them? A: I actually started my career working in a hemophilia research lab where I enjoyed learning more of the scientific aspect of the disease. I still miss working in the lab, factor assays were my favorite part. They were like a puzzle and   …Continue Reading


Thoughts on Thawing

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The method of thawing a frozen sample in the coagulation lab has a significant effect on testing results. It is imperative that the samples be thawed properly. The preferred method is thawing for 3-5 minutes in a circulating water bath. The thawing time of 3-5 minutes is based on a 1.0 mL vial and may need   …Continue Reading


Have You Heard the New Musical Group King?

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Is this the real thing? It’s not lyophilized….


Fresh Frozen Plasma vs Lyophilized: What should your lab use?

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Coagulation laboratories have a variety of choices for reagents.  What are the differences and why are they important? Fresh frozen reagents are collected from the donor and frozen immediately.  After thawing, they require no preparation, thaw and go. Lyophilization is the process of freeze drying a reagent to remove the liquid component. The process leaves   …Continue Reading


Lot to Lot Correlations

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Lot to lot correlations are common in today’s clinical laboratories. As explained in the recent CAP today article, “Differences between reagents and testing systems are known to contribute to test result variability, making crossover studies necessary when using new reagents or implementing new testing systems.”[1] Regulatory and accreditation standards require the lab to evaluate each   …Continue Reading


FVIII Activity: Chromogenic Assay Vs. Clot-Based?

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Factor VIII activity can be measured in different ways. Two of the assays used to assess the Factor VIII activity are the one-stage clotting assay and the chromogenic assay. The one-stage clotting assay is still the most widely used. The one stage clotting assay measures the extent a plasma sample corrects the coagulation time of   …Continue Reading


Factor Sensitivities – What’s the value, anyway? [Pun intended]

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Currently the global test used to detect intrinsic factor deficiencies in patients with bleeding is the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). The APTT reagent used should be sensitive to a reduction in coagulation factors such as FVIII and FIX that are commonly associated with bleeding. Literature states that it is desirable to have APTT systems   …Continue Reading


Von Willebrand Disease: The 4 minute overview [with images]

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Von Willebrand Disease (VWD) is a genetic disorder caused by missing or defective von Willebrand factor (VWF), a clotting protein. VWF binds factor VIII, a key clotting protein, and platelets in blood vessel walls, which help form a platelet plug during the clotting process. [1] History of the disease  The first written piece describing this inherited   …Continue Reading


Congenital Factor Deficient Plasma vs. Immunodepleted Factor VIII Deficient Plasma

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Using Factor VIII Deficient Plasma from a human donor with a congenital deficiency is preferred to using an artificial immunodepleted Factor VIII substrate. There are several aspects that make congenital factor deficient plasma preferable to immunodepleted. The immunodepletion process During the immunodepletion process, not only is the Factor VIII removed, but the vonWillebrand factor is   …Continue Reading